The Role of Oil in 9-11 and World War II

The motivation to control oil is one of the biggest reasons  for war in the world, and it’s been that way from the 1940s until now, and it is even a reason that the World Trade Center was destroyed by terrorists in hijacked jet airliners.

I’ll explain the 9-11 connection first.  Osama bin Laden wanted Americans out of Saudi Arabia and Islamic countries for religious reasons.  He mistakenly thought he could do that through acts of  terror. Americans are not there for religious reasons. They are there for oil.

Why are we in Iraq?  Not because weapons of mass destruction were found or that 9-11 had anything to do with it, the  two untrue reasons given by the George W. Bush administration. How about the other reason given, turning Iraq and the rest of the Middle East into American style democracies?  Why not just admit to the real reasons: oil and protection of Israel?  Who knows, SUV and Israel-loving Americans might buy those reasons.

If we are really all that interested in spreading democracy, why don’t we put pressure on Saudi Arabia, reputedly one of the most oppressive regimes in the world. Simple. That’s not why we are there. We are there because of oil.

As I said, it goes back to the 1940’s. The  Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor because of oil.  It needed lots of it to militarily spread the Empire of the Rising Sun.  It was getting a lot of it from the United States, and planned to get a lot more by taking Indochina.  Not being happy about the atrocities the Japanese were committing in China and other places, the U.S. not only cut off its oil spigot to Japan, but moved its headquarters for its Pacific fleet from San Diego to Hawaii.  Seeing both of these moves as an American plan to prevent Japan from taking Indochina, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.  Big mistake.  An isolationist United States forgot that idea, immediately united and put together the mightiest war machine in history.

Hitler’s Nazi Germany invaded North Africa and the Soviet Union for oil,  and other natural resources, in order to fuel his plan to create a massive German empire. The first invasion by  American troops in World War II was in North Africa where it joined the British to push Germany and Italy out of that oil-rich part of the world. The Soviet war machine, heavily supplied by America, and the Russian winter, drove Hitler out of the Soviet Union.

Yes, the  desire for control of oil has gotten millions and millions of people killed.  Everyone knows the solution to this: development and use of other sources of energy, especially renewable sources. Work has started on that, but no where near the effort needed to make it a reality in the near future.  Why?  Change  never comes easily, but change the world must, or the wars will never end. Unfortunately, never-ending wars suit some people.  They have to be defeated at the ballot box.

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5 Responses to “The Role of Oil in 9-11 and World War II”

  1. larryfeltonj Says:

    Wars based on oil have probably accelerated since WWII, but even before then fights over the oil fields were major parts of the violent conflicts. I’m reading Daniel Yergin’s book “The Price”. By the time of WWII and the Russian Revolution battles were fought over the Russian and Rumanian oil fields, and a lot of military maneuvering took place around the Anglo-Persian concession.

    In the long run you’re correct, and my own opinion is that solar energy is rapidly reaching grid parity, so that’s the way to go.

    • dicksworld Says:

      I’ll have to check out “The Price.” Thanks for letting us know about it.

      With the proper grid that you mention, solar could certainly supply a lot of power to the country. There is enough desert to collect the sun’s energy. Even some of the Middle-Eastern oil-rich countries are putting a lot of solar panels out in their deserts. They know that oil is a finite resource. We can do the same thing.

      Wind power is also a viable option.

      Combining the two might be the ticket.

      • larryfeltonj Says:

        It’s an incredibly detailed book. BTW I meant to write WWI above. One of the most dramatic events of the First World War was when Colonel John “Empire Jack” Norton Griffiths supervised the burning of the Ploesti (Rumanian) oil fields to keep the Germans from capturing them.

        One thing I learned from the book which I didn’t realize is that the value of oil had already exploded before the internal combustion engine was developed. The primary use was for processing into kerosene for lighting.

        But early in the First World War the use of automobiles for troop transport, and the invention of the tank, made it obvious that oil was a strategic resource.

  2. John Cornett Says:

    Nice, if inaccurate, rant.

    So where do liberals stand on this country developing it’s own oil resources so we don’t spawn any more imperialist, expansionist oil gluttony inspired wars over it ?

    • dicksworld Says:

      I can only speak for myself. And I refuse to let you speak for me.

      Oil is a finite resource. Its production has already peaked in the United States, The largest effort should go to building a grid that will transmit electric power from areas that can produce adequate supplies of eletricity via solar and wind. Another viable option is greater reliance on natural gas which Exxon is telling us is quite abundant. Then there is nuclear to consider. A lot of people are uncomfortable with that because of safety considerations. What happened in Japan has renewed fears about escaping radiaiton. They just had an explosion in a furnace in a nuclear waste plant in France, the country that relies the most on nuclear power with 58 reactors on line. One man was killed, but officials say there was no radiaiton leak.

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