What Excellence at Sochi and Legacy Hall Symbolize

As I watched America’s Sage Kotsenburg and Jamie Anderson soar through the air on their snowboards,  Russia’s Yevgeny Plushenko and 15-year-old Yulia Lipnitshaya flawlessly jump and land their quads and axels on skates, or America’s Meryl Davis and Charlie White impeccably execute graceful lifts and spins as they ice dance in the Sochi Olympics, I have to reflect on the incredible capability of the human brain and body to perform brilliantly.

The same thoughts surfaced as I sat in Legacy Hall at the River Center in Columbus, Georgia and was blown away by a young, skinny, tall, serious-faced Chinese music student at the Columbus State University Schwob School of Music doing seemingly impossibly intricate and really fast things on a viola,  or marvel at the world-class performances by the school’s faculty members Alexander Kobrin, pianist; Sergiu Schwartz, violist, and Wendy Warner, Cellist playing Trios by Franz Schubert and Felix Mendelssohn.

Yes, the human being is capable of thrilling performances in many areas.  But,  there is always this familiar question, why can’t we just get along with one another?  You’d think that if humans have the smarts and talent to do things like brilliantly play a piano and go to the moon, they would be able to solve differences without going to war, individually or collectively.

 

 

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