VInce Dooley Says College Football Facing it’s Greatest Crisis Ever

Unionization attempts, pay for play, player product endorsements etc. issues are threatening the very existence of college football, he says.   

Retired University of Georgia football coach  and athletic director Vince Dooley, who is now a  consultant for Kennesaw State University’s new football  program,  saved the most controversial part of his talk to the Rotary Club of Columbus until the very end of his  very entertaining talk.  After getting a lot of laughs about his years at Georgia, he made the point that to start paying players would bring about the end of college football.

He said giving the players a full scholarship and adding a cost of attendance payment should be enough.  He also wants a law passed to regulate those payments.  If such a law is not enacted, he said, the colleges would get into bidding wars for the best players, driving the costs so high college football would be dismantled. He also pointed out that if a school pays football players it will have to pay the atheletes in the other programs. 

Well, how about a law regulating what coaches can make?   That would stop bidding wars for the best coaches. While we’re at it, we could regulate pay for professional sports stars and coaches.  Could such regulations be considered a restraint of trade?

It’s really hard to make the case for not paying players who take great physical risks when their coaches are being paid millions of dollars, and the schools are raking in many millions more. 

I suppose we should clarify that by saying “some top-tier school” are raking in those millions. I’ve read where only  the top-tier schools make money on their athletic  programs.  Most  of them lose money on those programs. 

 

 

 

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2 Responses to “VInce Dooley Says College Football Facing it’s Greatest Crisis Ever”

  1. Terry Shirey, Sr Says:

    Dick:

    I’m sure Coach Dooley when referring to a “law” about payments to college athletics was referring to NCAA “rules” not actual legal action. As to your statement that “few” could disagree with athletics being “paid” almost half of the 355 NCAA members did just that when defeating a recent proposal to allow “cost of attendance” reimbursement.

    As to the “millions” paid to college coaches, Mark Richt at UGA is paid $3.2 million. That would rank him at number 10 if he were a network “news reader” such as Matt Lauer, Diane Sawyer, Scott Pelley, Anderson Cooper, etc.

    This is a complex matter and does have the capability of changing college football as we know it That may or may not be good. Stewart Mandel at foxsports.com has an excellent article on the subject of paying college athletics. I recommend it to you to expand your knowledge on the subject.

    Keep up the good work, continue to enjoy your column.

    Terry Shirey, Sr.
    Nashville, TN

  2. dicksworld.wordperss.com Says:

    Hi, Terry,

    What I said was, “It’s really hard to make the case for not paying players who take great physical risks when their coaches are being paid millions of dollars, and the schools are raking in many millions more.” I still think that. Those who voted against adding the “cost of attendance” maybe really don’t care about how well the case is made. Perhaps,they just simply don’t want things changed. That’s my opinion, of course.

    As for as the coaches making millions, if schools value coaches more than classroom teachers, fine. That’s the American way. Make all you can. However, that doesn’t apply just to the coaches. We all have that right, including the teachers and players.

    It appears that some of those multi-millionaire coaches want their student athletes to get more financial aid. Dooley said that he thought more could be done for them, but he’s not for “paying them.”.

    One thing’s for sure, this fight isn’t over .

    Thanks for taking the time to comment.

    Best regards,

    Dick .

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