Posts Tagged ‘Alabama’

The Trouble with Football

December 15, 2014

 

Retired legendary Georgia Tech basketball coach Bobby Cremins

Retired legendary Georgia Tech basketball coach Bobby Cremins

Bobby Cremins, the most successful Georgia Tech basketball coach ever – the school named its basketball court after him – talked as much about football as basketball when he spoke to  members of the Rotary Club of Columbus. That’s because the paying-players controversy affects basketball and all college sports. If you pay football players, you have to pay all team sport athletes. Not everyone agrees. Some say you pay the players that bring in the big bucks. That’s the way capitalism works.  People, they assert, who say you have to pay all of them are just using that as an excuse to keep from paying any.

Cremins agrees the players should get more of the “ridiculous” amount of money the TV networks are paying to broadcast the games.  When they see the schools and coaches getting millions of dollars, while they play the games and take the physical risks and get only a scholarship for and room and board, they feel cheated.  He says they have a case, but he is opposed to paying them.  Instead, he is for giving them a stipend.  So paying them a $5,000-a-month stipend, the figure being considered by the NCAA, is not paying them. Uh huh.

While college football is riding high now, the future is not so rosy.  A recent poll shows that 50 percent of American parents don’t want their sons to play football.  All the news about the brain injuries caused by concussions and about kids dying from injuries is taking its toll. Also, the news about brutal and criminal off-the-field behavior by some players has its effects.  College players are produced by high school football.

As for me, I enjoy a good game, especially if Georgia Tech, Georgia, Alabama, or Auburn are playing.  Still, as I have said before, if I had a young son, I would not want him  playing football. The physical risks are just too great.  It’s just not worth it.

 

 

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Profound for Monday

January 7, 2013

It’s Monday, so I guess I need to come up with something to say. Then again, I don’t want to say something just to be saying something. I need to come up with something profound.

My coughs getting better. That’s only profound for me and my friends and family.

What can I say that is profound for everyone?

We need more ethical, just, and moral government, and not for just a few, but for everyone. Thankfully, some of Georgia’s state legislators also believe that, or, at least say they do. State Senator Josh McKoon says he believes that and is willing to  stand up for it. Let’s hope he gets support, and let’s hope we get more than window dressing in the bill that gets passed, if one gets passed. 

What else can I say that is profound? I didn’t say original, just profound. 

We have term limits for president of the United States, and we have term limits for governor of Georgia and Alabama, and probably other states. But, what we don’t have  and what we need most is term limits for national and state legislators. Something really needs to be done to encourage lawmakers to do the right thing for all of us, instead of just pandering to those who pour money into their campaigns.

Let’s see if I can come up with one more profound statement. How about this: we need news media who seriously do investigative reporting by reporting the stuff that somebody doesn’t want you to know. The internet showed promise in providing a platform for reporting stories that the mainstream media either ignored or was afraid to report. It turned out a lot of  misinformation and some out-and-out lies, were being posted on the web. You really have to check out sources to make sure what you are reading  is true.

Okay, now we can stop the profound parade and get ready for the really big story, one that will no doubt win the rating wars tonight: Alabama and Notre Dame playing for the national college football title. I have connections with Alabama so I’ll be pulling for the Crimson Tide.  

 

 

 

 

ALABAMA IS DEFINITELY NUMBER ONE

January 8, 2010

ALABAMA  BEATS TEXAS  37 – 21  IN THE BCS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP GAME.

YEA,  ALABAMA!

(Gotta hand it to Texas, though, for putting up a good fight after losing its star quarterback to a shoulder injury. The team’s 18-year-old freshman quarterback did a remarkable job, but Alabama  just was not beatable.)

(What’s more, ABC showed both the Alabama Million Dollar Band and the Texas Band during the half. The sports guys didn’t yak for the whole half this time. Yea,  ABC!) 

Alabama’s Return to the Rose Bowl is Special

January 7, 2010

Alabama’s participation in the BCS National Championship game in the Rose Bowl is very special, and not just because it is the national championship, but because it’s the first time Alabama has played for the National Championship in the Rose Bowl since 1946. 

It all started in 1926, the game that  has been called the one “that changed the South.”  Alabama, being a Southern Team, was not supposed to win because Southern teams were thought to be no match for teams in the North.  Alabama beat Washington in that game and continued to return to the Rose Bowl to win most of the games it played there.

The Tuscaloosa News has a very good story about Alabama’s football history. You can check it out by clicking  this link.

Update: Not All Million Dollar Band Members Go to Pasadena

January 5, 2010

It turns out that not all members of the University of Alabama Million Dollar Band are going to Pasadena for the National Championship game between Alabama and Texas.  The size of the band at this point is 388 members, but only 349 of them, plus 26 support and administrative personnel, are going.  Band spokesperson Jane Hall says the Citi BCS National Championship organization is paying for the flight and specified the number of people it would transport.  She did say that some band members who live in other states may go on their own.

How Will I Celebrate Alabama’s 189th Anniversary?

December 11, 2008

  Sunday, December 14, 2008, the State of Alabama will be 189 years old. What are you going to do to celebrate?  I think I’ll go over to Idle Hour Park  because that is the part of Alabama that appealed to me the most when I was a child.  That’s when you could get on a Columbus city bus and ride it to Idle Hour Park in Phenix City.

  If it were the older park of my childhood, I could celebrate by going swimming in the pool, which is where I basically learned to swim; or, I could go to one of the two ballrooms and maybe do an anniversary waltz or something.  That’s right.  Two ballrooms.  One of them also doubled as a skating rink.  Maybe you’d skate up until it was time for the dance, which featured live bands and had one of those turning balls with tiny mirrors that reflected colored patterns on the walls and ceiling.  I could also celebrate by bowling, or having a hamburger in the restaurant next to the bowling alley. 

  I suppose the most memorable thing about Idle Hour was when I jumped off a whirligig type of thing on the playground and broke my leg.   Funny, how the bad things are always more vivid than the good ones.

  Frankly, the old Idle Hour didn’t have much class, but it was a lot of fun. The new Idle Hour does have  class, with the walking trail around the pond, manicured grounds and quaking ducks providing a really beautiful place to walk.   Back in the old days, the park, owned by Roy Martin, featured an inboard, expensive, furniture-quality wooden, fancy speedboat.  I think for $5.00 you were sped around the lake one time. Probably took 45 seconds.

 I won’t be able to do that, but maybe I’ll walk around the pond as the way I’ll celebrate  Alabama’s 189th birthday.

  Now, you may ask why I haven’t mentioned the illegal slot machines and casinos with roulette wheels, poker, craps,  and blackjack tables that were operating during my tender years.  They didn’t have any of that at Idle Hour Park. It was strictly a family place, though you could buy a beer if you were old enough. They did have  slot machines in other places, though, sometimes in a grocery store, and in the casino at Southern Manor night club. That was where Columbus’ Fate Leebern was murdered.  Yes, it was quite interesting to be able to go across the river to participate in those illegal vices, but I don’t think I’ll celebrate it.

Big Problem with Solving Water Shortages: Splintering

June 27, 2008

  The Metro Atlanta area is facing another long hot summer as drought conditions continue. Lake Lanier did regain some of the water it lost to last summer’s drought, but it wasn’t enough to bring the lake back to full. It is 14.4 feet below full and falling as the sun evaporates more than two-tenths of an inch every day.

 

 

Lake Lanier, October, 2007

Lake Lanier, October, 2007

 

 

  Billy Turner, of the Columbus Water Works, indicated that the drought probably won’t be as severe as it was last summer. The highest drought level is a 4.. The only part of the state that is still at that level is in the north Metro Atlanta area. The rest of the area is down to a 3. Most of the state, including Columbus, which had reached the #3 level, is at a 2, and the southeastern part of Georgia is at 0.

 

 

Billy Tuner, Columbus Water Works President

Billy Turner, Columbus Water Works President

 

  Efforts in Metro Atlanta are still underway to conserve water, with things like washing cars at home being banned, and limited lawn watering in effect, but can such measures do the trick?

 

  The Corps of Engineers has been allowed to hold back a little more water at Lake Lanier and some other reservoirs in Georgia, but not much. The Corps is mandated to keep level of river flow that protects downstream, was held back because the Corps must maintain the downstream flow. Folks downstream, especially at Apalachicola, Florida, like it that way. Metro Atlanta people aren’t all that happy about that.

 

  This drought has really brought home the mistaken past philosophy of dealing with this problem, which was to ignore recommendations made by planners long ago.

 

  Rick Perlstein writes in Campaign for America’s Future, “Atlanta boomed in the wake of the monster capital investments made in anticipation of the 1996 Olympics, the magazine [Atlanta magazine] reports; ‘In 1990, the Atlanta area was projected to draw 800,000 new residents over the next twenty years; in the ten years following the Olympics, the total population increased by almost 1.4 million…. But in that same ten-year period, the reservoirs that supply our most vital resource grew not a bit.’

  Perlstein says that a 1969 study by the Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission said infrastructure changes would be needed to avoid critical water shortages when Atlanta’s population reached between three and five million. In the 1980s, planners proposed networks of reservoirs throughout North Georgia. The project was deemed too costly. Instead, “What did the Atlanta metropolitan area do instead? Issue building permits – 48, 262 in 1996; 68, 240 in 2006.”

Turner told me that the big problem in the past has been splintering. Each county was looking after its own self interest. That doesn’t work. When making comprehensive water plans the state as a whole has to be considered.  The way one county use water affects neighboring counties.

Well, the planners are at it again. This time they are saying that, even with the emergency conditions caused by the draught, Atlanta will have enough water for the city to grow to 8 million people by 2030. Turner doubts that. So do I.

As I have said before, they put atlanta in the wrong place. Columbus has a greater water supply than Atlanta. Turner has stated in the past that Coumbus could easily handle a population of 6 million people. Metro Atlanta already has almost 5 million and look at the problem it is facing. It will have enough enough water for 8 million. I don’t think so, unless it can tap into another river system like it is exploring on the Georrgia-Tennessee line. Some are claiming that the border line is incorrect and that the Tombigbe River at that point is actually in Georgia.  Pursuing this would, no doubt add Tennessee to the Water War now being fought between Georgia, Alabama and Florida.

 

 

 

Impact of the BRAC Impact Hearing

June 23, 2008

  Last Tuesday evening I got the feeling that most people are still in denial about the huge way our world is changing and how they are going to have to change with it.

 

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  BRAC hearing at Columbus Public Library

 

  At the BRAC impact hearing at the Columbus Public Library, we all were given the opportunity of saying which of our transportation needs should have the top priority when 30,000 new folks with their thousands of cars and trucks move into the area.

 

 

                                          Voting Remote

Casting my vote

 

 

  When five options were listed on the screen, we used our voter remotes to register our choices. After all of the clicking was done, not to my surprise, the vast majority, 53 per cent, clicked on “minimize congestion.”  

 

                                         

 

 

“Add new sidewalks and bike trails” came in second at 22 percent.

 

 The one I clicked, “improve transit service” came in 4th at ten percent, beat out by “repair existing roads” at 12 percent.

 

  Last, and a big surprise to the folks who were conducting the hearing, was “improve access to Fort Benning,” at only 4 percent.  After all, the growth at Fort Benning is the reason for the big influx of people to our area.

 

  One man in the back of the room said he was surprised that “improve transit service” got such a low vote. I joined him in that opinion and said, “Considering the energy future, you have to wonder why people are still talking cars and roads and not mass transit and rails.”

 

  The man sitting next to me joined in with, “When gasoline hits $12 a gallon you are not going to have to worry about traffic congestion. People won’t be driving their cars.” 

 

  Retiring Deputy Superintendent of the Muscogee County School District Dr. Robin Pennock, said, “Solving the traffic congestion problem will take a combination of all of the options on that list.”

 

 

                                          

  Dr. Robin Pennock, Deputy Superintendent MCSD

 

  She was right, in my view.

 

  The BRAC (Base Closure and Realignment Commission) issue is bringing out a lot of other issues that are important to our community. They would be important, even if the

area wasn’t about to grow by about 30,000 people in the next few years.  I’ll be discussing them in future posts.

 

 

 

     

 

 

Welcome to Dick’s World

June 8, 2008

 

  I’m Dick and I welcome you to my world.

 

  My world, geographically, is Columbus, Fort Benning, Cumming, Smyrna, Kennesaw, Atlanta, and Athens, Georgia, Phenix City, Alabama, and Anywhere, U.S.A.

 

 That’s because I live in Columbus, which was just listed by some organization that does such things as the 4th best place in the United States to raise children. I am not sure why, but maybe one reason is because one of our Little League teams won the Little League Baseball World Series a couple of years ago. Balancing that are the low scores that too many of our public school kids are achieving on standardized tests.

 

  My son, daughter-in law, and two grandsons live at Cumming.

 

   I have stepsons, a step daughter-in-law, and step-grandchildren in Kennesaw, Atlanta, Athens, and one who drives a semi and just might call me from anywhere in the country.  

 

   I go to Smyrna a lot because my niece and her family live there.

 

    Part of this new blog of mine will be about what happens where they live since that’s part of my world.

 

   The rest will be about current events in Columbus, Georgia; Phenix City, Alabama; Georgia, Alabama, and, well, the world.

 

  It will also be about philosophy, movies, books, TV shows, music, politics and anything that I just happen to want to talk about.  

 

  Also, I am interested in you and what you think. So you are welcome to comment on any post on the blog. I just ask that you refrain from hardcore gutter language – oh, a hell or damn here and there is okay – and libelous statements. I reserve the right not to print any comment, but I don’t recall not publishing any non-spam comment on my last blog, newsmanbook.com.   

 

  Again, welcome. Please make yourself at home.