Posts Tagged ‘C.A.L.L.’

CALL Calls Again

September 15, 2016

Live and learn takes on special meaning when it comes to the Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning in Columbus, Georgia.

Learning with a lot of friends is quality living. And that’s what happens with about 200 seniors who attend CALL classes, trips, Pinocle and board games, and socials at the Columbus State University’s Turner Center for Continuing Education.

Everyone, who pays registration fees,  is eligible to attend. Mostly retired folks join. There are lots of retired professionals, including educators, health care folks, a lawyer, a broadcast journalist (guess who), and others including a former Jeopardy champion and a Radio City Music Hall Rockette — really!

So, if you want to learn more about thngs like Inventions that Changed the  World, Understanding Great Art, Line Dancing, History’s Great Military Blunders, CSU Theater, and more go to the front desk at Turner Continuing Ed and sign up. $145 pays for annual membership for three quarters, or $65 for one. Believe me it’s a big time bargain.

Classes start September 26.

 

 

 

I Didn’t Know it was There

May 27, 2014
Green Mansion Restaurant

Green Manor  Restaurant

One thing you can usually count on when you take a  Columbus  Academy of Lifelong Learning, or  CALL,  trip is a locally owned, not-a-chain  restaurant.  While we didn’t eat lunch at a chain restaurant, we got a good  look at the home office of one. On our way to Atlanta to take a tour of the  Chick-fil-A Home Office, we stopped for lunch at the Green Manor Restaurant in Union City.

It’s not called Green Manor because of the ample greenery surrounding it, but because it’s named after the man who bought it in 1917, Dr. Albert Green.  His descendents still own it.  It’s a grand old mansion with 10 fireplaces, and things  like stained glass windows and doors.  The lunch buffet featured quite good Southern cooking, which you eat in style at tables with cloth table cloths.  All  in all it, was a satisfying dining experience. 

CHick-fil-A Home Office Atrium

Chick-fil-A Home Office Atrium

 The tour of the Chick-fil-A Home Office  turned out to  be a lot more interesting than I thought it would be.   The main building is a show place, with an atrium lobby that reminds me of the big, fancy Atlanta hotels. It also has an antique auto museum,  and two 1946 Fords, because Chil-fil-A founder S. Truett Cathy started the chain in 1946 with a small diner called the Dwarf Grill, which was close to the now-closed Ford assembly plant under construction in Hapeville.  The plant opened and started putting Fords together in 1947.

1946 Ford

1946 Ford

You can read all about the Backstage Tour at the Chick-fil-A website.

 

 

My Dell with Windows Vista Doesn’t Know me Any More

October 8, 2013

Here I was, all set to write a post on my recent visit to Williamsburg, Virginia replete with pictures when BAM! my 6-year-old Dell laptop with Windows Vista decided it didn’t know me any more.  A notice came up saying that my Profile Service service had failed. That meant I couldn’t get to my pictures which had been transferred to my PhotoShop 6 from my camera card.  I have since learned I can get a camera card adapter for my iPad, which fortunately still works fine, and I’ll take care of that tomorrow.  So maybe I’ll be able to to do the post on Williamsburg tomorrow.

Then, again, if the Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning class we call What’s Happening, a current affairs discussion class, produces some espeically interesting information on the subject “Why Has the Georgia Legislature Abandonned Public Education?” I’ll probably do a post on that and wait till later on Williamsburg.  Georgia State Sen. Josh McKoon, a Republican, and Rep. Carolyn Hugley, a Democrat,  will participate in the discussion at the CSU Turner Continuing Ed Center.  There is a good chance that someone will try to refute the premise of the subject and tell us that the Georgia Legislature has not abandoned public edcuation.  It should be interesting.

Meanwhile, my ailing Dell with Windows Vista is in the shop,  and hopefully will soon be back on line.  I probably should get a new computer.  6 years is probably considered ancient for a computer by the in-the-know computer aces.  I’m thinking about a MacAir.  I understand there is a learning curve when switching to a Mac, but learning new things is supposed to be good for seniors like me.

20 Years of Keeping Brains Healthy

March 11, 2013
Ruth Kiralfy and Gerda Smith, who have been memberss of C.A.L.L. since inception.

Ruth Kiralfy and Gerda Smith, who have been members of C.A.L.L. since inception.

When my old friend Gerda Smith retired from her many years of teaching elementary school students, she decided she needed “something  to do after retirement to keep my brain healthy.”  That’s why she became a charter member of the Columbus College Academy of Lifelong Learning in 1993.  Columbus College is now Columbus State University, so, I guess that would have been a little  long for the group’s name so it was shortened t0 the Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning, or C.A.L.L.

Gerda was happy to be among the current C.A.L.L. members who gathered Saturday to celebrate the organizations 20th birthday.  Since I have been a member for a number of years, I was there, also.  I need to keep my 82-year-old brain healthy, too.

You don’t have to be as ancient as me to become a member.  I think some of our members are in their fifties, mere babes.  If you do become a member, you’ll be offered a whole array of classes that range from Beethoven to current events to line dancing, and lots more, including card games and social events. So if  you are retired, keep that brain active and healthy and have some fun at C.A.L.L.  

For more information go to this link.  

“In The Mood” put me In the Mood to Go to the RIverCenter More

February 25, 2013
CALL group touring the RiverCenter

CALL group touring the RiverCenter

In the Mood really put me in a good mood yesterday afternoon at the Bill  Heard Theater at the RiverCenter.  I enjoyed the tribute to the big band era of the 30s and 40s, not only because it was the popular music of my youth, but because of the top-notch performances of the orchestra and the singers and dancers. 

As you would imagine, the audience was made up of Columbus area seniors.  And there were a lot of them there.  I was glad to see that because some shows are the RiverCenter aren’t attracting large crowds.  This one did, and the audience loved it.

I think I enjoyed it even more because, along with my fellow members of the Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning, I had just attended the RiverCenters’ backstage tour.  It was truly interesting to see all of the stuff that goes on to present a big show.  Just standing on the orchestra pit elevator as it was lowered and raised in front of the gargantuan stage and seeing how it worked with a unique set of jacks was worth the time spent on the tour.  

It is truly a wonderful facility with its three first-rate theaters, the Studio Theater for smaller intimate productions, Legacy Hall for mid-sized concert events – Professor Joseph Golden played a fanfare he wrote on the million-dollar Jordan organ for us –  and the world-class Bill Heard Theater that rivals anything in New York.

The largest share of money to support the operation is from ticket sales.  I hope you’ll do your self a favor and enjoy some of the shows, and support the facility in the process.

The famous Gilbert and Sullivan comic operetta The Mikado plays the BH Theater on March 2nd.  It will be performed by the New York Company, a full-fledged production with a 17-piece orchestra.  The Mikado is one Gilbert and Sullivan’s most popular operettas.  It is touted to be a very colorful production, set in Japan, but it really satirizes Victorian Britain institutions. I plan to be there.  Hope you will join me. 

 

CALL Helps Keep Our Brains as Well as Our Bodies Active

February 5, 2013

The Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning, also called CALL, keeps growing.  More and more seniors in the Columbus area are discovering a place that provides not only continued learning, but the opportunity to socialize with  others who want to keep their brains and bodies active.

Not only are there classes on subjects as diverse as foreign policy and line dancing, but trips to  places like the Atlanta Aquarium,  tours of the River Center, and lunches  at places like the River Club.  Do I recommend CALL? Well, I have been attending for a number of years. Our classes are conducted at the Elizabeth Bradley Turner Center for Continuing Education at Columbus State University.

CALLING on Montgomery

April 30, 2012

We had another nice CALL trip Saturday. ( CALL stands for Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning.)   A bus load of us went from the parking lot at the Columbus State University Elizabeth Bradley-Turner Center for Continuing Education  to Montgomery, Alabama to soak up museum and theater culture.

First, we went to the Montgomery Museum of Art.  It is a beautiful facility with lots of interesting classical  and contemporary art, plus impressive displays of glass sculpture.  As I commented to some fellow travelers – I couldn’t have called them that in the 1950s because Sen. Joe McCarthy would have investigated us – the Montgomery and Columbus art museum buildings are more artistic and beautiful than the big High Museum in Atlanta.  I realize that such judgements are subjective –  but then isn’t all of art?

After that, we had lunch at Montgomery’s Olive Garden.   It took  so long for our big crowd to get served, I was afraid we would miss the play at the Shakespeare Festival, but, alas, we didn’t. The food was worth the wait. I had  Venetian Apricot Chicken.  It’s grilled chicken, asparagus, and brocoli, covered with an apricot sauce.  It’s was maybe a little too sweet for me, but as I got use to the abundance of sugar, it started tasting good. I don’t know why restaurants think they have to over-sugar and over-salt everything.  As everyone knows, it’s easy to add salt and sugar,  but impossible to take it out of food.

The weird play at the Shakespeare Festival was not by Shakespeare.  They mix them up.  They are doing some Shakespeare later in the season. The play we saw was a spoof of the famous Alfred Hitchcock 1935 movie cloak-and-dagger thriller The 39 Steps.  Four actors – really good ones – played all of the parts a la Springer Tuna style, but with four people  instead of just  two. Once one gets into the hang of the thing, it’s fun.  It is broad, slapstick farce, sort of like the early TV Show of Shows with Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca  skits, only this skit was a full-length play, or maybe another way of putting it is that it was the Four Stooges with British accents. The actors got a lot of laughs and a thundering standing ovation when it was over.

All in all, it was another enjoyable CALL excursion.  If you are retired and want to enjoy lifelong learning with a bunch of freindly fun-loving folks,  when the CALL classes crank back up in the Fall, come join us.  There is a fee, but it’s reasonable.

CALL Goes to Robbins AFB Museum of Aviation

February 22, 2012

As promised, here’s a post on the Saturday Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning (CALL) trip to the Robbins U.S. Air Force Base Museum of Aviation..

I have been wanting to go to the aviation museum for years, but never got around to until CALL folks decided to go.  I’m really glad I got to see it.

When you first walk in you are really impressed with a display of one of the world’s greatest jet fighters, an F-18.

The Stearman World War II trainer hanging above the F-18, though, was the one that really resonated with me. That’s because I flew in the front cockpit of one as it did aerobatics for a TV news feature many years ago. It was a hoot. .

If I remember what Chief Anderson, the original flight instructor at Tuskegee University, who trained Red Tail pilots, told me, the bi-plane was used for early training of the Tuskegee Airman,  but the trainer shown below replaced the bi-planes.  This display honors the Tuskegee Airmen of World War II.

There are so many great aircraft to see, but no doubt one of the most impressive is a B-29 like the one that dropped atom bombs on Japan to end World War II.  Sitting in front of it is the casing of an A-bomb.

If you like airplanes, especially military airplanes, you’ll really enjoy a visit to the Robbins Air Force Base  Museum of Aviation.

CALL on the Road

February 21, 2012

We don’t just sit around classrooms all the time listening to lectures, having discussions, and playing bridge. We also go places and see things together. When I say we, I am talking about members of the Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning of the Columbus State University Turner Continuing Education Center.

Check out this incredible porcelain art.

A bus load of us saw that at the Massee Lane Gardens Stevens-Taylor Porcelain Gallery at Fort Valley, Georgia.

I was able to get a lot of the folks together for this group shot.

They had just returned from touring the gardens, looking at beautiful flowers like the ones Betty Auten is checking out.

There were more men in the group than usual, it seemed. It could have been because the next stop on the tour was the Robbin’s Air Force Base Museum of Aviation.  Not that the men didn’t enjoy great porcelain art or beautiful camellias, nor that the women didn’t enjoy great aircraft, because everyone seemed to enjoy both.  I’ll show you some of those great aircraft on our next post.

Former Foreign Service Officer Facilitates C.A.L.L. Course

January 17, 2010

Lifelong learning is attracting some impressive volunteer teaching talent in Columbus.  For instance, how are you going to beat having a retired State Department Foreign Service officer to facilitate a discussion of global issues that affect everyone?  He is one of the new volunteer facilitators for the Columbus Academy of Lifelong Learning.  C.A.L.L.  has a great group of volunteer teachers and facilitators, but this post would be too long if I listed all of them.    

Bain Cowell, former Foreign Service officer, facilitator for Great Decisions

Bain Cowell,  who will facilitate the Great Decisions course,  worked as a Foreign Service officer, serving as a diplomat in Brazil, the Dominican Republic,  Paris, Luxemburg, and the U.S. Mission in NATO, the European Union, and other places.   I asked him why he agreed to facilitate the course, and he said, via email, “I volunteered as a facilitator for ‘Great Decisions’ because I enjoy teaching-and-learning, especially in the seminar/discussion format.  I have fond memories of previous stints as a graduate student teaching assistant at Yale in the 1960s, as a university instructor/lecturer at Emory and Georgia Tech in the 1970s, and more recently as an instructor at WHINSEC.”

Also, part of his impressive background is his Army service  in the Vietnam War, where he was decorated with a Bronze Star  and Air Medal.  

You’d never know he has that impressive background – oh, I almost forgot;  he speaks four languages – when you talk with him. He is quite  accessable and friendly. 

All facilitators do little promotional announcements at the C.A.L.L. registration meeting.  His class immediately filled up and ran out of the Great Decision course books.  

If  you would like to attend some of the C.A.L.L. classes – there are a lot of them – just fill out a form at the CSU Turner Center for Continuing Education, pay $55 and you’re in. The first class is on January 25th.