Posts Tagged ‘Italy’

Having Fun with Facebook: PIC QUIZ

December 20, 2011

It took me a little while to really get involved with Facebook. I thought, I have a blog  and I have email so why should I fool with Facebook?  Still, I kept hearing so much about it from people I know that I decided to give it a try.  Now, it turns  out I’m having fun with it with my PIC QUIZ.

I submit one of the photos I took over the past 56 years and ask folks to see if they can identify it.  I do this, so far, on most days, but I can’t promise every day  because sometimes I have other things to do.

My first photo dates back to when I bought my first 35mm camera.  I had just arrived in Germany in 1955 courtesy of the United States Army and decided I couldn’t pass up  the opportunity to record what I saw in Europe.  Here’s the pic and the declaration of who won.

PIC QUIZ WINNER IS SUE NELSON. She guessed that it is one of the Munich, Germany city gates. It’s the Isartor gate. The center tower was built in 1337, and the octagonal towers in the 15th century. Congratulations, Sue. ATTTAGIRL!

Yes, as you can see, there is a prize. The winner gets the  ATTAGIRL or ATTABOY AWARD,  and sometimes when it takes a bunch of people to come up with the answer, the ATTATEAM AWARD.

The second one was when I was on leave in Italy.

And the winnah is…Dixie Close Turman. She correctly identified Mt. Vesuvius and wins the ATTAGIRL AWARD for PIC QUIZ #2. Congratulations, Dixie. I took the picture on a tour of some of Italy when I was on Army leave in 1956.  

Not all of them will date back that far.  Here’s my latest one.

… and the PIC QUIZ winnah isssss…..Keith Lovett, the first person to correcltly identify the picture of a London Eye capsule.
 
That one was taken on a 2004 visit  to London.  I’ll have a new one soon. If you’d like to play, just come to my Facebook wall (profile) and join in.
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New Life for 35mm Slides

August 8, 2011

Like millions of others alive before digital cameras came along, I shot hundreds of film slides.  Since almost no one owns a 35mm slide projector any more, I figured if I wanted people, especially my family, to be able to see those slides, I had better transfer them to digital images.  I was delighted to learn that a 33mm slide scanner is available, and purchased one.

On the blog post I wrote about my grandson Benjamin going into the Air Force, I referred to my visits to some famous places in Europe while I was in the Army between 1954 and 1956. Risking the natural resistance to looking at other folks personal slides, I’m going to show you a few. That means it’s OK if you show me some of yours.

First of all, a look at  your photographer.

This was taken by a 30th Army Band buddy at a small post (don’t remember the name) in the Bavarian Alps, where we had gone to play for a parade.  Being the headquarters’ band for the Munich, Germany area, we played for a lot of  small posts that had no band, which meant we made a lot of trips up some interesting mountain roads.  My brother Elbert, who had toured Germany at the end of World War II, had told me what a beautiful countryside Germany possessed.  He was right.  To be honest, this is not one of the pictures I scanned. I had this one done a few years ago at Columbus Tape and Video, the only place I could find that would print a 35mm slide. They did it, if I remember correctly, by projecting it on a screen and taking a picture of it that could be printed.

Here’s one that I scanned with the $70 scanner I found online.

This is a shot of the Isar River that flows through Munich. It was taken late in the late afternoon, I think.  Munich did have a lot of overcast days, especially in the winter, one, we were told at  the  time, was one of the coldest on record.  One morning a DJ on the Armed Forces Radio Network said, “If you want to vacation somewhere that’s warmer today, let me suggest the North Pole.” I chose it because I read  it’s used now for white-water sports, just as we are about to do on the Chattahoochee at Columbus.

Now, here’s one that’s lit a little better.  It’s a picture of…well…you’ll know.

Now you can show me yours. That’s only fair. Just  hit the comment button and give me your URL so I find them