Posts Tagged ‘outsourcing’

Will W.C. Bradley Return Manufacturing to Columbus?

January 22, 2015
Marc Olivie', CEO W.C. Bradley Company, and Matt Swift, COO W.C. Bradley Real Estate Division and Rotarian

Marc Olivie’, CEO W.C. Bradley Company, and Matt Swift, COO W.C. Bradley Real Estate Division and Rotarian

“I don’t foresee it anytime soon,” W.C. Bradley Company CEO Marc Olivie’ told members of the Rotary Club of Columbus.

He went on to explain that Wal-Mart is planning to spend more than 50-billion-dollars on American manufactured goods and that it would continue to buy Char-Broil grills if manufacturing returns from China to America if the price remains the same.  A company sponsored survey of consumers asked if they would be willing to pay five dollars more for a grill if it were made in America. The answer was an unequivical “no.”

The question was raised during a question and answer session held after Olivie’ had spoken on the status of W.C. Bradley Company.   The company, which had a very good year,  is selling millions of grills, Zebco fishing reels, and Tiki outdoor torches. None is made in America.  Zebco operates out of Tulsa and Tiki Torches out of the Milwaukee area.

While those products are sold globally, the company’s real estate business focuses on the Columbus area. It has extensive holdings in downtown Columbus and Olivie’ says he finds the revitalization of downtown very exciting, that it is truly a plus for the area.

Matt Swift, fellow  Rotarian and President and COO of the W.C. Bradley Company Real Estate Division, said, “We would not have been able to attract this Belgian and his wife to Columbus if downtown and Columbus in general was not attractive to them.”  This day and age a city has to have the arts, quality educational facilities and other attractions to entice talent, and that attracting talent is the name of the game in business.

Olivie’ also pointed out how valuable Columbus State University  is to the Columbus area.  Cities with good universities attract management talent. CSU has already played a big role in revitalizing downtown with its transfer of its arts schools and is about to play an even larger one when it also moves its College of Education and Health Professions downtown.

W.C. Bradley Company owns 25 buildings, which occupy about a million square feet, in downtown.  Except for the condos sold at Eagle and Phenix Mill No. 3,  it rents its downtown buildings to occupants,  Swift said.

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My Top Ten Wish List for the U.S. in 2015

January 5, 2015

I wish that…

!.  The United States does not get into another war. 

2. The United  States Congress concentrates on working for what’s best for the country instead of what’s best for members of Congress.

3. The astronomical cost of healthcare stops rising.

4. The cost of education for physicians is greatly reduced, bringing the cost more in line with other countries, many of which provide free education for physicians.

5,  American universities put more emphasis on lowering the costs of education than adding administrators and new buildings.

6.  That we start valuing excellent educators more than football coaches.

7. American news media return to the days of responsible journalism, concentrating more on stories that affect people’s lives and less on sensationalism and that we produce more journalists like H. L. Mencken, Ida Tarbell,  David Halberstam, Edward R. Murrow, Walter Cronkite,  Ben Bradlee, and Woodward and Bernstein. 

8.  That our economy continues to improve.

9 .  That we continue the trend toward producing more renewable energy.

10.  That more of us follow Martin Luther King, Jr.’s admonition that we judge people “not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

What do you wish most for in 2015?  

 

 

Making America’s Olympic Team Uniforms in China Highlights Extent of Outsourcing Dilemma

July 14, 2012

WE NEED MORE STORES THAT SELL ONLY GOODS MADE IN AMERICA

Maybe the news that uniforms for America’s Olympic team were made in China will help American shoppers understand that  they hold the key to stopping the flow of  jobs to incredibly cheap labor countries.

A story in the AARP magazine gives hope. There are stores springing up that only stock American made products. One is Norton’s U.S.A  in Barrington, Illinois. Another is Made in America in Alma, New York.  Business keeps getting better for them. 

A Perception Research International survey shows that consumers “50 through 64 say ‘Made in the USA’ labels influence their purchases.” 81 percent of people 50 through 64 buy American because they believe it helps the economy.

Let’s hope many more stores that sell only American made products go into business. I don’t know of any in the  Columbus-Phenix City area. If there are some that you know about, let me know.  However, you can still buy American online at sites such as AmericanAisle.com and MadeinUSA.com.

So maybe some of the American made items cost a little more because some companies pay their employees a living wage.  Henry Ford paid his assembly line workers well because he wanted them to be able to buy his cars. People have to make money in order to be able to spend it on goods and services.

It may be hard to find things made in America because businesses are not in business to create jobs, but to make a profit. They will pay attention, though, if you go next door because that store sells stuff made right here in the good old U.S. of A.